Big Moves in Mobile Banking

 

Mobile banking, a feature that’s been around for years, has suddenly become a primary means for credit union members to carry out as much of their financial activity as possible.

Let’s take a look at how mobile banking is succeeding – and the areas that need some work.

Winning Features from Top CUs

Nerd Wallet recently shared a list of the 6 Best Banks and Credit Unions for Mobile Banking, and here are the top tools each is using to entice customers and enhance their mobile offerings:

  •  Tools for managing and increasing savings
  • High interest rate on savings
  • Generous ATM fee reimbursements
  • Advanced mobile app security
  • Wide branch access
  • High daily limit for depositing checks

This is a great cross-section of the types of features mobile banking customers are coming to expect.

Balance Preview & Other Communication Features

Balance preview is a successful feature Alliant Credit Union implemented that allows members to check their balances quickly without logging in.

More transparent communication options are going to be big draws for mobile banking apps as more and more people move away from doing business in physical credit union locations and adopt a more mobile-forward approach on a permanent basis.

Communication features like messaging and chats that connect members to customer service representatives are also great features for any mobile banking app. This allows some AI or one-to-one interactions to help your customers navigate functionality or update issues and answer general information questions.

Mobile Bill Pay Is Mutually Beneficial

Online and mobile bill pay is a great process that mutually benefits credit unions and their members. Automating payments means peace of mind and one less thing to worry about for members, and it also means credit unions don’t have as many late payment issues to work through.

This is still an area of potential growth for many credit unions. Running targeted campaigns and offering informational materials describing the benefits and features of automatic bill pay could increase your credit union’s appeal and position as a tech-forward financial option.

Personalization

As with many mobile-based programs, mobile banking is going to evolve to become more and more customizable for users. Everyone carries out their financial responsibilities differently, so it makes sense that mobile banking is also going to benefit from this personalization.

Personalization can include a variety of transactional or banking insights based on each member’s preferences and activities, icon placement and size, photos, and personal financial goals.

Security

This personalization can also be applied to security features. The goal of the mobile banking experience should be to fit into every member’s lifestyle and preference. A tall order, but many online experiences are incorporating similar features to create the optimal experience for each user.

As for security, this could mean creating options for fast, seamless login features like fingerprint scans, face ID, push notifications for logging in and tracking activity, and other biometric-based options.

Implementing security features that can stop cyber criminals without making login and verification processes annoying and time-consuming for users is going to be the challenge here.

For Credit Unions Looking to Update Their Digital Solutions

IMS Integration has a host of great credit union solutions, including Make a Statement, Online Courtesy Pay, Online Self Service forms, and Trial Balance. Request a consultation today for more information about our credit union solutions.


2020’s Digital Push May Mean Future Security Risks

 

In 2020, credit unions prioritized service over expansion. But creating new digital solutions for members and employees was a whirlwind of uncertainty and this year, leaders will need to stay extra vigilant when it comes to credit union cybersecurity.

Now, many credit unions are focused again on expansion. 2021 looks to be the year 2020 was meant to be, in terms of growth. For this to happen, however, credit unions must protect themselves from cybersecurity setbacks. Here’s why:

Credit Union Cybersecurity

Your credit union, just like any other financial institution right now, has likely checked and rechecked your credit union cybersecurity solutions and protocols in the wake of rising fraudulent activity and cyber breaches taking place all over the country.

Credit union IT professionals have been working tirelessly for the last year to ensure all firewalls and anti-malware programs are present and running on all devices in your network.

The good news is, in most cases, your credit union is at low risk of being breached through your many security systems and protocols. But there is a chink in your credit union’s armor – and it’s your employees.

The Chink in Your Credit Union Armor – Your Employees

Your employees are one of the best assets your credit union has – and unfortunately, they are also often inadvertently to blame for cybersecurity breaches.

According to Varonis, 95% of cybersecurity breaches are caused by human error. And in the last year, your employees have been thrown out of their element and into new remote and hybrid work models, which increases the chances of a breach.

Even if your employees are only performing their work on approved devices, it’s still vitally important to continue educating them on new threats and how to avoid them.

Sending alerts, reminders, and educational material about phishing (one of the top methods employees fall for when it comes to cybersecurity breaches) is a great way to foster a cyber security-minded work culture and bridge gaps in tech-based employee skills.

Some common features of phishing emails to look out for include:

  • Offers that seem too good to be true. Phishing emails often have some kind of amazing, lucrative deal for recipients or even include information about a product or prize you’ve “won.”
  • Sense of Urgency. The point of these emails is to entice readers to “act now” or “click here” in a short amount of time or they risk losing the “special offer.”
  • Hyperlinks. Cybercriminals often use hyperlinks to mask the real link they want you to click on. To see if a link is legitimate, hold your mouse over the linked text to reveal the real link you will be navigating to. Be careful and check for typos in the link, as many phishing emails say they’re taking you to a legitimate website like “yourbank.com” but if you look closely, the “m” is really an “r” and an “n” set together to trick you into thinking the link is legitimate.
  • Attachments. If you are not expecting emails with attachments, or the attachment seems odd, don’t click on it. These attachments may have viruses or other malware that are released upon opening.
  • Unusual sender. The cardinal rule of employee-based cybersecurity is this – if you aren’t expecting an email from someone, don’t open it – especially if it has any of the abovementioned hallmarks of a phishing email.

Kick Start Your Credit Union’s Digital Expansion

Keep your credit union moving forward. IMS Integration offers premiere solutions for Keystone users:

  • Corelation Solutions: Skip a Pay, Reward Checking, and Online Courtesy Pay+.
  • Infuzion: This powerful tool was developed to streamline complex functions without spending hours developing scripts.
  • Web Loan Applications: Loans are critical to your credit union’s success. Enhance your member experience by implementing our online loan applications system, which tightly integrates with KeyStone core.

If you want to explore our offerings further, or you have questions about our solutions, contact us today.


2020 In Review for Credit Unions

 

The pandemic and other disasters caused a lot of uncertainty for your members and employees this year. As 2020 comes to a close, it’s important for leaders to review what they’ve learned so they can prepare for 2021. 

Here are the top insights credit unions have learned this year:

Members Need Digital Experiences

When the world locked down and started working remotely, members flocked to your credit union’s digital services. What was once seen as conveniences became needs, but your members still craved customization and personalization through your digital services and remote communication styles. They demanded improved digital experiences

In addition to increased phone volume and, potentially, the unveiling of video chatting at your credit union, your members increased the use of your website and mobile app. Website accessibility became even more valuable to serve more of your members.

As we’ve said before, “The digital member experience needs to be as close as possible to an all-encompassing, no limits, one-on-one discussion about the many products and programs your credit union offers.”

You may have seen a need to improve your software and digital infrastructure throughout this season. But those improvements don’t end with 2020. It’s imperative that credit unions continue to optimize the digital experience for their members on an ongoing basis. 

Related resources from our sister company, Information Management Solutions:

Cybersecurity is Increasingly Important

Credit unions across the nation, among other businesses, are finding that cybersecurity is critical for the well-being of their business and to keep their members’ data secure. 

We’ve known for a while that cybercriminals don’t discriminate who they attack and that not all cyber threats have malicious intent, but this year has made it even harder for smaller credit unions to keep up with the security demands placed on them, especially when transitioning to WFH environments. 

We previously summed this up as “Cybersecurity in 2020 is even more important than it was in past years because financial institutions can’t afford to be breached or hacked during these uncertain times.”

At the end of this year, one thing is clear: if your credit union hasn’t already, it’s time to strengthen your cybersecurity initiatives. 

Related resources from our sister company, Information Management Solutions:

Members Require a Better Experience

Your members want more. Their needs are always changing. As younger generations join credit unions and as time moves forward, member expectations change. This is especially true for 2020 as members’ needs changed practically overnight.

This year, credit unions helped their members use self-service options and embrace digital services. Your employees quickly felt the loss of that in-person community that is created within a normal credit union environment – and everyone on your team knew that many members felt the same loss.  

Customer service became less about benefits and more about personalizing the customer experience, even while working remotely. As we prepare for and head into 2021, it’s important to continue improving the member experience across the board. 

Related resources from our sister company, Information Management Solutions: 

Prepare for 2021

At the end of the day, your credit union is constantly working on ways to better serve your members. Members continue to be the most important focus for a credit union’s efforts, from the leadership team to each member service representative. For this reason, all of these insights that credit union leaders have learned over the year are important to take into 2021. 

Like you serve your members, our team at IMS Integration is here to serve you. Contact us to learn more about how we can help your credit union.


COVID-19 Cybersecurity For Credit Unions

 

The CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) Act has helped millions of Americans weather the COVID storm, but it has come with a downside. As more than $2 trillion made its way to businesses and individuals, cybercriminals saw an opportunity to make some big paydays for themselves.

Cybersecurity in 2020 is even more important than it was in past years because financial institutions can’t afford to be breached or hacked during these uncertain times. But how can credit unions fight back?

Old Fraud, New Tricks

“New account fraud, identity theft, cybersecurity risks, imposter and money mule schemes, and mobile banking application fraud are all on the rise as a result of the opportunities related to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic,” says Rodney Hood of the NCUA.

Here are some helpful cybersecurity tips for protecting your credit union and your members.

Increase Communication Security

With many Americans working from home, the need for good communication increases. Tools like Zoom and GoToMeeting are fostering company communication, but these platforms are not without risks. When creating meetings on these platforms, there are lots of options for increasing their cybersecurity.

Update each meeting’s privacy and security features to prevent what’s known as “Zoombombing” – when outside parties or unauthorized persons join a meeting. Change your meeting IDs consistently, mandate that all meetings have passwords, and don’t use the same password over and over. You can also enable the “waiting room” feature where those who have just tuned in to the call can stay until you or another meeting leader gives permission for them to join.

Employee Education

The more trained eyes you have, the easier it is to stop fraudulent activities before they do widespread damage. During those Zoom meetings, set aside some time during every call to discuss cybersecurity.

Ask your staff if they have noticed any unusual account activity or suspicious emails in their inbox. Share weekly tips on how to spot phishing attempts, phony email accounts, and unsafe links. You can also create educational material and discussions around specific topics like we’ve done in the section below.

Keep an Eye Out for Unemployment Insurance Fraud

Though unemployment numbers are decreasing, there are still millions of Americans filing for unemployment insurance benefits every week. And with COVID-19 continuing to impact the global workforce, scammers are jumping at the chance to over-collect on these benefits or steal them outright.

This is a great opportunity to educate your employees and members on the red flags:

  • An account that receives unemployment benefits from another state with no explanation, or from multiple states
  • An account that receives the benefits of more than one individual
  • New accounts being opened with no transactional activity that is suddenly used to collect unemployment insurance benefits.

Using resources like the NCUA and other trusted reporting sites to create a “profile” for fraud can help you and your staff recognize these red flags. You can do this with each threat or type of fraud, encouraging awareness and prevention of these issues.

Comprehensive Member Education

One of the greatest assets a credit union offers to its members is educational resources. Schedule some time to create online classes or educational materials that address these new cybersecurity risks. It’s also a great time to highlight past fraud prevention and financial literacy resources, which will act as a refresher on the topic and help your members find these resources later.

The more people (members and staff) who are educated in fraud prevention and cybersecurity solutions, the better.

IMS Integration Can Help

At IMS Integration, we make solutions to help you save time and protect your members. Contact us to learn more about how our member-facing web solutions can help you better serve your members.